Debate & Mock Trial

" The College Board recently revamped the SAT test to focus more on exactly the sorts of skills debate teaches. " -Stanford National Forensic Institute
Debate & Mock Trial
The Hudson School
601 Park Avenue
Hoboken, NJ
7189541357
8-14
1:00pm - 5:00pm
Jul 8, 2019 - Jul 12, 2019
Teacher is typically there 15 minutes early and 15 minutes after
No

This camp combines two of our most popular programs: Debate and Mock Trial.

Speech and Debate

The objective of this program is to prepare participants for the myriad situations that require formal and informal presentations. Participants will learn how to craft and present arguments, opinions and ideas. They will learn the fundamentals of rhetoric and will practice informing, persuading and motivating an audience in a variety of ways. The grading rubric was adapted with the permission of Neil Mercer, the Director of research and Head of Faculty at The University of Cambridge.

Parliamentary Debate
Students will learn to effectively present and defend a persuasive argument using the ARESR method developed by the English Speaking Union. Students will learn to outline, draft, develop and deliver effective arguments and counter arguments. They will learn to refute using the four steps of effective refutation. They will explore what is efficient-and inefficient-in arguments (and counter arguments) and the different methods that popular orators have used throughout the years to sway opinion. We will also address political framing techniques, speaker-audience and speaker-topic commonality, persuasive rhetoric, fallacies in reasoning, persuasive use of evidence and stylistic devices.

Mock Trial
Mock trial is a hands on simulation of the American judicial system. The goal is to help participants acquire a working knowledge of our judicial system, develop analytical abilities and communication skills, display leadership in a court of law, and gain an understanding of their obligations and responsibilities as participating members of our society. Materials for this course are provided by The American Bar Association and The Constitutional Rights Foundation.

Exploration and explanation of basic legal concepts, court etiquette and vocabulary
-Criminal vs. civil trial

-Bench vs jury trial

-Prosecution vs defense

-Lay witness vs expert witness

-Presumption of innocence

-Burden of proof

-Reasonable doubt

-Rules of Evidence

-Use of exhibits

-Direct vs circumstantial evidence

-Objections and objectionable material

-Witness impeachment

Case Analysis
-Analysis of statement of charges

-Breakdown of the elements of each charge

-Analyzing the burden of proof

-Outlining the evidence for and against each charge, including: Forensic evidence, eyewitness testimony and statements

-Determining motive or lack of motive

-Determining the opportunity or lack of opportunity to commit the crime

-Analysis of corroboration and/or inconsistencies between witnesses

-Analysis of exhibits


Assignment and analysis of roles in the mock trial
-Pairing witnesses with testimony

-Preparing students for the duties of each role

-Explanation and exploration of the trial process as it relates to each role


Writing and practicing Direct examinations
-Purpose, scope and expectations for each role

-Analysis of proper examination

-Further analysis of witness statements

-Outline of direct examination

-Draft of direct examination

-Analysis and removal of objectionable or extraneous material

-Witness preparation

-Adjustment based on witness preparation

-Timing of direct examinations and further editing if needed

-Responding to objections


Writing and practicing cross examinations
-Purpose, scope and expectation for each role

-Analysis of proper cross examination

-Analysis of anticipated direct examination

-Further analysis of witness statements

-Outline of cross examination

-Draft of cross examination

-Analysis and removal of objectionable, leading or extraneous material

-Witness preparation

-Adjustment based on witness preparation

-Timing of cross examinations and further editing if needed

-Responding to objections

Writing and practicing re-direct examinations
-Purpose, scope and expectation for each role

-Analysis of proper re-direct examination

-Analysis of cross examination as it pertains to re-direct examination

-Determining what needs clarification and/or dismissal

-Analysis of objectionable and/or extraneous material

-Timing of re-direct examination and further editing if necessary


Writing and practicing openings (Prosecution/Plaintiff and Defense)
-Purpose, scope, structure and expectations for openings

-Persuasive rhetoric and opening arguments

-Analysis of jury instructions and jury

-Developing and delivering the 'theme' of a case

-Analysis of extraneous or unhelpful information

-Further contemplation of burden of proof and how it pertains to the openings

-Contrasting analysis of defense's opening to the prosecution's opening

-Outline of the opening

-Draft of the opening

-Timing of openings and further editing if necessary

Writing and practicing closings (Prosecution/Plaintiff and defense)
-Purpose, scope, structure and expectations for closings

-Analysis of the charges, evidence, testimony and adjustments that the case may have brought

-Analysis of reasonable doubt

-Persuasive weighing of each argument

-Analysis of what may and may not be referenced in the closing

-Discussion of adaptability and last moment adjustments

-Outline of closings

-Draft of closings

-Timing of closings and additional editing if necessary

Mock trial performance

Notes:

• Students must bring their own lunch. Snacks will be provided. Parents must email camp director with any allergies in advance. This class requires a minimum of five students to run.

$750
Hudson school students qualify for a 15% discount
2019
  • " According to Arne Duncan, then-Secretary of Education, debate is “uniquely suited” to build skills required of a modern citizen, including critical thinking, communication, collaboration, and creativity."
  • Forbes published an article titled “How to Find the Millennials Who Will Lead Your Company,” suggesting that the leaders of the future are ex-debaters.
  • "Speech and debate students see tangible benefits from participation while in school – confidence in speaking situations, spontaneity in interviews, improved writing in other courses, diverse perspectives." -National Federation of State High School Associations